Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:42:55 -0400

This photo provided by the CDC shows an ebola Virus. U.S. health officials are monitoring the Ebola outbreak in Africa but say the risk of the deadly germ spreading to the United States is remote. (AP Photo/CDC)NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. health officials are monitoring the Ebola outbreak in Africa but say the risk of the deadly germ spreading to the United States is remote.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 13:11:50 -0400

FILE - In this May 22, 2009 file photo, President Barack Obama fist bumps Chauncy Lorrell Gray, from Chicago, as he approaches the stage to receive his diploma at the United States Naval Academy graduation ceremony in Annapolis, Md. The familiar knocking of knuckles spreads only one-twentieth the amount of bacteria that a handshake does, researchers report. That's better than a high-five, which still passes along less than half the amount as a handshake. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak, File)NEW YORK (AP) — When it comes to preventing the spread of germs, maybe the president is on to something with his fondness for fist bumps.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:48:15 -0400

In this July 24, 2014, file photo, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., right, with Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. The chairmen of the House and Senate Veterans Affairs committees have reached a tentative agreement on a plan to fix a veterans' health program scandalized by long patient wait times and falsified records covering up delays. Miller and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., scheduled a news conference Monday, July 28, to talk about a compromise plan to improve veterans' care. (AP Photo/File)WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan deal announced Monday would authorize about $17 billion to help veterans avoid long waits for health care, hire more doctors and nurses to treat veterans and make it easier to fire executives at the Department of Veterans Affairs.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:39:49 -0400

In this photo taken on Sunday, July 27, 2014, Medical personnel inside a clinic taking care of Ebola patients in the Kenema District on the outskirts of Kenema, Sierra Leone. Liberia President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has closed some border crossings and ordered strict quarantines of communities affected by the Ebola outbreak. The announcement late Sunday came a day after Sirleaf formed a new taskforce charged with containing the disease, which has killed 129 people in the country and more than 670 across the region.(AP Photo/ Youssouf Bah)DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — No one knows for sure just how many people Patrick Sawyer came into contact with the day he boarded a flight in Liberia, had a stopover in Ghana, changed planes in Togo, and then arrived in Nigeria, where authorities say he died days later from Ebola, one of the deadliest diseases known to man.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:32:27 -0400

In this 2014 photo provided by the Samaritan's Purse aid organization, Dr. Kent Brantly, left, treats an Ebola patient at the Samaritan's Purse Ebola Case Management Center in Monrovia, Liberia. On Saturday, July 26, 2014, the North Carolina-based aid organization said Brantly tested positive for the disease and was being treated at a hospital in Monrovia. (AP Photo/Samaritan's Purse)FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Kent Brantly always wanted to be a medical missionary, and he took the work seriously, spending months treating a steady stream of patients with Ebola in Liberia.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:28:46 -0400

Abdulsalami Nasidi, director of the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC), Lagos state health commissioner Jide Idris and Lagos Special Advisor on Health Yewande Adesina, speak about the update on the Ebola outbreak during a news conference in LagosBy Tim Cocks LAGOS (Reuters) - The Nigerian city of Lagos shut and quarantined a hospital on Monday where a Liberian man died of the Ebola virus, the first recorded case of the highly-infectious disease in Africa's most populous country. Patrick Sawyer, a consultant for Liberia's Finance Ministry in his 40s, collapsed on arrival at the Lagos airport on July 20. The decontamination process in all the affected areas has commenced," Lagos state health commissioner Jide Idris told a news conference. Ebola has killed 672 people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone since it was first diagnosed in February.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:15:28 -0400

Shelly Sterling's lawyer Pierce O'Donnell gestures as he arrives at the court in Los AngelesBy Eric Kelsey LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - The record $2 billion sale of pro basketball's Los Angeles Clippers to former Microsoft Corp chief executive Steve Ballmer can proceed over the objections of co-owner Donald Sterling, a judge tentatively ruled on Monday. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Michael Levanas said the deal, brokered by Sterling's estranged wife, Shelly Sterling, was permissible and could be consummated even if Sterling, who has been banned for life from the NBA for racist remarks, chose to appeal. The ruling was a major victory for the NBA and Shelly Sterling, who had asked the probate judge to confirm her as the trustee of the family trust that owns the Clippers after having her 80-year-old husband removed when neurologists deemed him to have early Alzheimer's disease and was unable to handle business affairs.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 19:05:21 -0400

Antoun as Daberlohn and Crebassa as Kann perform on stage during a dress rehearsal of 'Charlotte Salomon' in SalzburgBy Michael Roddy SALZBURG Austria (Reuters) - The Berlin-born Jewish artist Charlotte Salomon left behind a body of watercolors and text she called "Life? Salomon's life, which has inspired films, plays and a musical, was turned into an opera that plumbed the depths of human emotion in its premiere on Monday at the Salzburg Festival in Austria. With music by French composer Marc-Andre Dalbavie, staging by Swiss director Luc Bondy and libretto by German-Jewish author Barbara Honigmann, who used 85 percent of Salomon's own text, the work was the season's most anticipated opera at the prestigious festival in the city of Mozart's birth. Although a gang of uniformed Nazi toughs appeared at strategic moments as a reminder of the inevitable ending, the opera focused more on the difficult emotional and intellectual problems Salomon faced as a young woman.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 18:51:08 -0400
(Reuters) - Targacept Inc said it was stopping development of a drug to treat overactive bladder after it failed to show significant reduction in incontinence in a mid-stage study. The company's shares fell 32 percent in extended trading after it canceled its third drug development program in eight months and said it may change the direction of its research. Targacept said based on this and previous trial results its key technology did not appear to produce "new treatments with a meaningful improvement over the current standard of care." Targacept's key technology is based on modulating receptors found in the central nervous system which transmit signals between various organ systems and the brain. The company still has one compound based on this technology in clinical development to treat diabetic gastroparesis which causes the partial paralysis of the stomach.
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 18:12:20 -0400

The Helms Amendment Hurts Women and Undermines U.S. Development Efforts Around the WorldIn August, President Obama will welcome leaders from across the African continent to Washington, DC, for a three-day Africa Leaders Summit, the first such event of its kind to be hosted by the U.S., though China, Japan, India, and the EU have held similar summits with African heads of state. A main goal of the summit is to strengthen ties...


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 17:36:07 -0400

Health workers wearing protective suits walk in an isolation center for people infected with Ebola at Donka Hospital in Conakry on April 14, 2014The deadly Ebola virus can spread like a forest fire, US health authorities said Monday, urging travelers to West Africa to take extra precautions amid the largest outbreak in history. Since March, there have been 1,201 cases of Ebola and 672 deaths in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. Two Americans -- one doctor and one healthcare worker -- in Monrovia, Liberia have come down with the virus, characterized by fever, joint pain, diarrhea, vomiting and often fatal bleeding. "The likelihood of this outbreak spreading beyond West Africa is very low," admitted Stephan Monroe, deputy director of the CDC's National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 17:29:00 -0400
By Colleen Jenkins WINSTON-SALEM N.C. (Reuters) - The family of a Texas doctor who contracted the deadly Ebola virus in West Africa had traveled back to the United States before he showed symptoms and was not at risk for getting or spreading the disease, U.S. health officials said on Monday. Dr. Kent Brantly, 33, is one of two American relief workers to test positive for the highly contagious virus that has killed 672 people across the region in the largest-ever Ebola outbreak, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. He was treating Ebola patients in Monrovia, Liberia, in his role as medical director for a case management center run by North Carolina-based Samaritan’s Purse, a relief organization headed by evangelist Franklin Graham. The organization said a missionary from Charlotte, North Carolina, was also in isolation receiving treatment after testing positive for Ebola.
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:46:05 -0400
Doctors Struggle To Contain Ebola Outbreak
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:43:41 -0400

Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell, center, flanked by Treasury Secretary and Managing Trustee Jacob J. Lew, left, and Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez, speaks at a news conference at the Treasury Department in Washington, Monday, July 28, 2014, to discuss the release of the annual Trustees Reports. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare's financial future is looking brighter despite a growing wave of baby boomers reaching retirement.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:39:05 -0400

Medical staff working with Medecins sans Frontieres prepare to bring food to patients kept in an isolation area at the MSF Ebola treatment centre in KailahunFREETOWN (Reuters) - Sierra Leone's president visited the center of an Ebola outbreak on Monday as West African leaders stepped up efforts to contain the spread of the deadly virus. It was Ernest Bai Koroma's first visit to the northeastern district of Kenema since the start of the epidemic that has killed some 672 people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), making it the worst outbreak yet. Sierra Leone has the highest number of Ebola cases, at 525, surpassing neighboring Guinea where the virus was first reported in February. ...


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:34:04 -0400
By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People who run in their spare time, even if it’s not very fast or very far, tend to have a lower risk of dying from heart disease or from any cause than non-runners, according to a new study. It’s difficult to use more rigorous randomized controlled trials to look at outcomes like death, because that takes so long to track, said lead author Duck-chul Lee, from the College of Human Sciences at Iowa State University in Ames. Participants answered questions about their physical activity habits over the past three months, including running speed, duration and frequency. About 3,400 people died during that time, including roughly 1,200 from cardiovascular causes, including heart disease and stroke.
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:33:10 -0400
By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - People with dementia are more likely to get pacemakers than people without any cognitive impairment, according to a new study. The study can’t explain why people with dementia are more likely to get the devices, which help control irregular heart rhythms, according to the lead author. “It may be completely appropriate,” Nicole Fowler said. “There may be something that we haven’t been able to measure that makes people with dementia need them more.” Alternatively, she told Reuters Health that the difference could represent family members or doctors choosing more aggressive treatment for people with dementia.
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:25:12 -0400

As the Seasons ChangeWhen I was 19, a wise wino told me, "The truth only hurts for a minute." In September I will turn 60, and that truth hurts for more than a minute. The sad thing is that when (if) I am 70, I will be wishing I were 60, like I wish I were 50, like I wished I were 40 when I turned 50. However, when I turned 40, I was such a party animal that I did...


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 16:19:53 -0400

A man runs through Boston Common on April 19, 2014 in Boston, MassachusettsRunning as little as five to 10 minutes per day can significantly cut the risks of getting heart disease and dying young, said the findings in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. People who exercised by running showed a 30 percent lower risk of death and a 45 percent lower risk of dying from cardiovascular disease than people who did not run at all. "Since time is one of the strongest barriers to participate in physical activity, the study may motivate more people to start running," said lead author Duck-chul Lee, an assistant professor in the Iowa State University Kinesiology Department.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 15:40:35 -0400

U.S. President Obama participates at the Summit of the Washington Fellowship for Young African Leaders in WashingtonPresident Barack Obama is getting updates on the outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Nigeria, an administration official said on Monday, noting U.S. agencies had increased their assistance in the past several weeks. The outbreak of the highly infectious disease has killed 672 people. The United States has been providing supplies including personal protective equipment, the administration official said. "We have been engaged on this outbreak since April, when the first cases were reported and have increased response significantly over the last several weeks as the outbreak deepened," the official said.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 15:38:16 -0400
By Jason Lange and David Morgan WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Tamer spending at U.S. hospitals and expected savings from President Barack Obama's healthcare overhaul are shoring up the funding outlook for the Medicare program for the elderly, trustees of the program said on Monday. Medicare's trust fund for hospital bills will run out of money in 2030, four years later than previously estimated, the trustees said in a report. The trustees, however, reiterated a warning that the Social Security program would run out of money to fully pay disability benefits by 2016 and could not meet all of its obligations on pensions after 2033. While the arrival date for Medicare's crunch has been pushed into the future, an aging population is already stressing the finances of programs that provide income for the disabled.
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 15:32:09 -0400

Voice of Young Adult Cancer: Who, Me?Two days before I was supposed to leave Thailand and head back to the U.S., my post-college graduation travel high came to a cold stop when I woke up on a boat covered in blood and dirt with a swollen tongue. I asked my friend what happened and she looked at me like I was crazy. She took me out to the stern of the boat, sat me down and in what...


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 15:18:52 -0400
LOS ANGELES, July 28 (Reuters) - Los Angeles Superior Court judge Michael Levanas said he will rule Monday afternoon on whether club owner Donald Sterling can halt the $2 billion sale of the NBA's Los Angeles Clippers. Sterling's estranged wife, Shelly Sterling, has asked Levanas to confirm her having the authority to sell the team to former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer in the wake of racist remarks that Donald Sterling made. (Reporting by Eric Kelsey; Writing by Mary Milliken; Editing by Meredith Mazzilli)
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 15:08:08 -0400

Sanders and Miller announce bipartisan legislation to address problems in the VA health care system, at the U.S. Capitol in WashingtonBy David Lawder WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Leaders of the Veterans Affairs committees in the U.S. Congress said on Monday they had struck a rare compromise deal on legislation that provides about $17 billion in funding to ease long waiting times for VA medical centers. Senator Bernie Sanders, an independent, and Representative Jeff Miller, a Republican, said the figure marks about the halfway point between the competing proposals they announced last week. The compromise measure aims to clear months-long waiting lists at VA hospitals and clinics across the country. The agency has been rocked by scandal over cover-ups of these waiting times, prompting the resignation of VA Secretary Eric Shinseki in late May. In Phoenix, doctors have alleged that some 40 veterans died as their names languished on secret waiting lists while officials misrepresented wait-time data to meet targets for bonus compensation.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 14:31:03 -0400
By Andrew M. Seaman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Drugs that have been investigated to increase so-called “good” cholesterol may not prevent deaths, heart attacks or strokes as many hoped, according to a new analysis. Due to limitations in existing studies and ongoing experiments involving these and other drugs, researchers not involved with the analysis caution that it’s too early to give up on medications that increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, however. “In the time before statins were available, there were several pieces of evidence that HDL-raising drugs reduce cardiovascular events, but since the time statins have been used there is now evidence that HDL-targeted therapies don’t do anything to decrease mortality,” said Dr. Darrel Francis, the study’s senior author from Imperial College London. Unlike low-density lipoprotein (LDL), which is the so-called “bad” cholesterol that piles up in blood vessels, HDL is considered good because it’s thought to chip away LDL cholesterol.
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 14:23:14 -0400

U.S. President Obama fist bumps the cashier after paying for his order at Franklin Barbecue in AustinDitching handshakes in favor of more informal fist bumps could help cut down on the spread of bacteria and illnesses, according to a study released on Monday. The study in the American Journal of Infection Control found that fist bumps, where two people briefly press the top of their closed fists together, transferred about 90 percent less bacteria than handshakes. "People rarely think about the health implications of shaking hands," Dave Whitworth, a biologist at Aberystwyth University in the United Kingdom who co-authored the study, said in a statement. The fist bump appears to enjoy the support of both U.S. President Barack Obama and the Dalai Lama, both of whom have been seen enthusiastically using the greeting, the study notes.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 13:43:28 -0400

Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Burwell speaks at a news conference at the Treasury Department in Washington, Monday, July 28, 2014, to discuss the release of the annual Trustees Reports. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare's finances are looking brighter, the government said Monday. The program's giant hospital trust fund won't be exhausted until 2030 — four years later than last year's estimate.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 13:43:08 -0400

The building of the now-closed Peanut Corporation of America plant is pictured in BlakelyBy David Beasley ATLANTA (Reuters) - The federal trial of three former peanut company officials charged in connection with a salmonella outbreak that killed nine people and sickened hundreds more began on Monday with jury selection in Albany, Georgia. The contamination at the Peanut Corporation of America plant in Blakely, Georgia, led to one of the largest food recalls in U.S. history and forced the company into liquidation. Former owner Stewart Parnell, and his brother, Michael Parnell, a food broker who worked on behalf of the peanut company, were charged last year in a 76-count indictment asserting they created fake certificates showing their products were uncontaminated when laboratory results showed otherwise. The plant's quality control manager, Mary Wilkerson, and Stewart Parnell were also charged with obstruction of justice.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 13:34:01 -0400
People caring for infected individuals- from friends and relatives who may be taking care of the diseased at home or the doctors treating the ill in hospitals- are among the most commonly infected.
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 13:29:09 -0400
People caring for infected individuals- from friends and relatives who may be taking care of the diseased at home or the doctors treating the ill in hospitals- are among the most commonly infected.
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 13:14:48 -0400

In this photo taken on Sunday, July 27, 2014, a boy, center, selling soft drinks walk past a clinic taking care of Ebola patients in the Kenema District on the outskirts of Kenema, Sierra Leone. Liberia President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has closed some border crossings and ordered strict quarantines of communities affected by the Ebola outbreak. The announcement late Sunday came a day after Sirleaf formed a new taskforce charged with containing the disease, which has killed 129 people in the country and more than 670 across the region.(AP Photo/ Youssouf Bah)DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — There has been panic and fear about the deadly Ebola disease spreading ever since Nigerian health officials reported Friday that a Liberian man sick with the disease had traveled to Togo and then Nigeria before dying. Here are five things to know about Ebola and how it is spread:


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 12:53:05 -0400

Dr. Jide Idris, Lagos' state commissioner for Health, speaks during a news conference on the death of an Ebola victim in LagosBy Tim Cocks LAGOS (Reuters) - The Nigerian city of Lagos shut down and quarantined on Monday a hospital where a man died of Ebola, the first recorded case of the highly infectious disease in Africa's most populous country. Patrick Sawyer, a consultant for the Liberian finance ministry aged in his 40s, collapsed on arrival at Lagos airport on July 20. The decontamination process in all the affected areas has commenced," Lagos state health commissioner Jide Idris told a news conference. Authorities are monitoring a total of 59 people who were in contact with Sawyer, including airport contacts, the Lagos state health ministry said.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 12:50:28 -0400

In this July 24, 2014, file photo, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., right, with Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. The chairmen of the House and Senate Veterans Affairs committees have reached a tentative agreement on a plan to fix a veterans' health program scandalized by long patient wait times and falsified records covering up delays. Miller and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., scheduled a news conference Monday, July 28, to talk about a compromise plan to improve veterans' care. (AP Photo/File)WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan deal to improve veterans health care would authorize at least $15 billion in emergency spending to fix a veterans health program scandalized by long patient wait times and falsified records covering up delays.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 12:35:49 -0400

Liberia's President Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf speaks in Davos on January 22, 2014Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has announced the closure of most of the Ebola-hit country's land borders after the deadly tropical virus spread to two of west Africa's largest cities. Liberia, along with neighbouring Guinea and Sierra Leone, is struggling to contain an epidemic that has infected some 1,200 people and left at least 670 dead across the region since the start of the year. Last week authorities in Sierra Leone's capital Freetown and Lagos in Nigeria announced their first cases, marking an alarming new front in the fight against a disease mainly confined to remote villages and rural outposts. "All borders of Liberia will be closed with the exception of major entry points," Sirleaf said in a statement late Sunday.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 12:17:34 -0400

Marijuana plants for sale are displayed at the medical marijuana farmers market in Los AngelesBy Barbara Liston ORLANDO Fla. (Reuters) - Support for legalizing medical marijuana in Florida is holding steady at 88 percent despite weeks of vigorous campaigning by opponents ahead of a November referendum on the issue, a poll released on Monday showed. The survey, conducted by Quinnipiac University, did not specifically ask about the ballot measure but indicated support was well beyond the 60 percent threshold needed for the constitutional amendment to become law. A Quinnipiac poll in May also found that 88 percent of voters backed legalizing marijuana for medical use, up from 82 percent in November 2013. The Florida Sheriffs Association launched its campaign against medical marijuana in April.


Mon, 28 Jul 2014 12:15:59 -0400
(Reuters) - Shares of AcelRx Pharmaceuticals Inc plunged almost 40 percent after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration rejected its pain treatment late on Friday. The rejection also reduces the lead the drug device, Zalviso, was likely to have over a rival from Medicines Company, which was submitted for approval in late June. Analysts, who were surprised by the decision, said the issues cited by the FDA were "rather mild" and expected Zalviso to eventually receive approval. The FDA in its complete response letter (CRL) sought more data to ensure proper use of the device but did not ask for additional human clinical trials.
Mon, 28 Jul 2014 12:15:23 -0400
People caring for infected individuals- from friends and relatives who may be taking care of the diseased at home or the doctors treating the ill in hospitals- are among the most commonly infected.
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