Thu, 24 Jul 2014 16:57:32 -0400
NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration isn't required to hold public hearings to evaluate the health risks of widespread use of antibiotics in animal feed, a federal appeals court ruled Thursday.
Thu, 24 Jul 2014 13:39:23 -0400

FILE - In this March 31, 2014 file photo, people sign up for the Affordable Care Act at Swope Health Services, in Kansas City, Mo. The Associated Press interviewed insurance agents, health counselors and attorneys around the country who said they received varying subsidy amounts for the same consumers. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)MIAMI (AP) — Linda Close was grateful to learn she qualified for a sizable subsidy to help pay for her health insurance under the new federal law. But in the process of signing up for a plan, Close said her HealthCare.gov account showed several different subsidy amounts, varying as much as $180 per month.


Thu, 24 Jul 2014 01:27:24 -0400
BEIJING (AP) — A nine-day quarantine imposed on parts of a northern Chinese city where a man died of bubonic plague has been lifted, China's official news agency reported Thursday.
Sat, 26 Jul 2014 02:35:05 -0400

Security guards stand inside the Husi Food factory in ShanghaiRegulators in Shanghai have found that scandal-hit China-based food supplier forged production dates on some of its products and sold them after their expiry, the official Xinhua news agency reported on Saturday. Shanghai Husi Food, which is owned by Illinois-based OSI Group, is at the center of China's latest food scandal, which has spread to Hong Kong and Japan, over allegations it mixed expired meat with fresh meat. Shanghai Municipal Food and Drug Administration has found that Shanghai Husi forged the production dates on smoked beef patties produced in May 2013 and sold them as being made in January 2014, Xinhua said.


Fri, 25 Jul 2014 20:06:07 -0400

This undated photo released by the Avenal State Prison public information office shows an aerial view of Avenal State Prison in Avenal, Calif. Federal experts are recommending that California test inmates for immunity to a sometimes fatal soil-borne fungus before incarcerating them at two Central Valley state prisons, Avenal and Pleasant Valley, where the disease has killed nearly three dozen inmates, according to a report obtained Friday, July 25, 2014, by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Avenal State Prison Public Information Office)SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Federal experts are recommending that California test inmates for immunity to a sometimes fatal soil-borne fungus before incarcerating them at two Central Valley state prisons where the disease has killed nearly three dozen inmates, according to a report obtained Friday by The Associated Press.


Fri, 25 Jul 2014 20:04:42 -0400

What It Feels Like Waiting for Cancer Test ResultsI was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2006. For the past eight years since my operation I've gone every few months for a blood test or scan. I just had another clear scan, and by now I'm used to the routine, although sometimes if I have a cold or I'm not feeling 100 percent I still feel as I did when I wrote the piece below, when I lived alone...


Fri, 25 Jul 2014 19:00:32 -0400
ABUJA, Nigeria (AP) — An Ebola outbreak that has left more than 660 people dead across West Africa has spread to the continent's most populous nation after a Liberian man with a high fever vomited aboard an airplane to Nigeria and then died there, officials said Friday.
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 18:18:53 -0400

Tyson food meat products are shown in this photo illustration in EncinitasTyson Foods Inc said it will discontinue operations at three of its factories which make processed meat products such as sausages and hot dogs, affecting about 950 people. The largest U.S. meat processor, which won the bidding war for Hillshire Brands Co in June, said the closures were not related to the acquisition. "The decision to close these plants was underway long before the (Hillshire) discussions began", Tyson spokesman Gary Mickelson told Reuters. Tyson outbid Pilgrim's Pride Corp with its $63 per share offer for Hillshire, valuing the Jimmy Dean sausages maker at $8.55 billion.


Fri, 25 Jul 2014 18:18:01 -0400
(Reuters) - A U.S. appeals court ruled on Friday in favor of a Florida law that bars doctors from asking patients about gun ownership, overturning a decision in the so-called "Docs v. Glocks" case by a lower court that had struck it down. Florida's Republican-led legislature passed the law after a north Florida couple complained that a doctor asked them if they had guns, and refused to see them after they declined to answer. A panel of the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, in a 2-1 vote, vacated the federal judge's ruling and described the law as a "legitimate regulation" of professional conduct that simply codified good medical care. Any restrictions it places on physicians' speech was entirely incidental, the appeals court said, since it "was intended to protect patient privacy and curtail abuses of the physician-patient relationship." Lawyers representing doctors and others had argued that the law violated healthcare providers' First Amendment rights by threatening them with heavy fines and the possibility of losing their license should they broach the subject.
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 18:00:58 -0400

U.S. President Obama disembarks from Air Force One as he arrives at Los Angeles International AirportBy Steve Holland and Jeff Mason WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama urged the leaders of three Central American countries on Friday to work with him to stem the flow of child migrants who have surged across the U.S. border and warned that most of them would not be allowed to stay. In a White House meeting with the leaders of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, Obama had a tough-love message: his administration had compassion for the children, but not many would qualify for humanitarian relief or refugee status. The meeting came as Obama struggles to contain a border crisis triggered by the tens of thousands of children who have crossed the Texas border with Mexico in recent months.


Fri, 25 Jul 2014 17:36:27 -0400

Members of Doctors Without Borders (MSF) wear protective gear at the isolation ward of the Donka Hospital in Conakry on July 23, 2014Nigeria said Friday that Ebola caused the death of a Liberian national who died in quarantine in Lagos, confirmation that the worst-ever outbreak of the virus has reached Africa's most populous country. Nigeria's Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu told journalists that "thorough medical tests" had confirmed "the virus of Ebola" as the cause of death. The 40-year-old, who died overnight, worked for the Liberian government and had travelled to Nigeria from Monrovia by air via Togo's capital Lome. His final destination was the southern city of Calabar where he was scheduled to attend a meeting organised by the west African bloc known as ECOWAS (Economic Community of West African States), the minister said.


Fri, 25 Jul 2014 17:20:14 -0400
Drug doses and suppliers are sometimes kept secret, experts say.
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 16:36:16 -0400
By Amanda Orr HOUSTON (Reuters) - A North Texas city reopened a public park on Friday, a day after three of its maintenance crew employees were attacked by a swarm of bees with one being stung more than 1,000 times. "Crews performed an extensive search to make sure the bees hadn't come back, and once that was done, they took down the barricades in the area," said Barry Levy, a spokesman for the city of Wichita Falls, about 100 miles (160 km) northwest of Dallas.
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 16:33:38 -0400
"It really pushed the envelope" in terms of how early babies begin to learn, lead researcher Charlene Krueger, associate professor at the University of Florida's College of Nursing, said on Thursday. Krueger had the women repeat three times out loud a set 15-second nursery rhyme, and do it twice a day for six weeks. The fetuses’ heart rates were monitored at 32, 33 and 34 weeks as they listened to a recording of a female stranger recite the rhyme. By the 34th week, Krueger said, the heart rates of the tested fetuses showed an overall slight decline while listening to the recording, compared with a control group of fetuses whose heart rates slightly accelerated while listening to a recording of a new nursery rhyme.
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 16:17:13 -0400
President Barack Obama told Central American leaders on Friday that his administration had compassion for the influx of children crossing the U.S. border but said those without valid claims to stay would be sent home. In a meeting at the White House with the leaders of Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras, Obama said there may be some instances in which migrants from those countries could apply for refugee status, but those instances would be few. Obama said the United States shared responsibility with those countries to address the problem, including the role of drug trafficking. Obama also said he hoped lawmakers would approve a request for emergency funds to address the border crisis before leaving Washington for a multi-week recess.
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 16:10:39 -0400
By Jon Herskovitz AUSTIN Texas (Reuters) - Troubled lethal injections in Oklahoma and Arizona have raised questions whether medical personnel are skilled enough to humanely put an inmate to death, and if things go wrong, expert enough to revive one if an order is given. Almost all of the 32 states that use the death penalty either require or permit a physician to attend executions, which often are carried out by lesser-trained medical personnel, but doctors who participate risk losing their license to practice medicine if they are discovered to have helped. Among the reasons for the recent problems include that medical personnel in the death chamber may not be familiar with mixing or administering new lethal cocktails being used after traditional supplies of execution drugs dried up, nor treating any side effects.
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 16:07:58 -0400
By Shereen Lehman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Snowboarders who use personal music players while boarding have fewer injuries but the injuries they do sustain tend to be more severe, reports a new study from Canada. Typical risk factors for snowboard injuries include being at an intermediate skill level, snowboarding at night and using jump or half-pipe features at a terrain park, the authors of the study note. Wearing a helmet reduces the risk of head injuries and is mandatory at many terrain parks. The analysis was part of a larger study looking at injuries among snowboarders using terrain parks, lead author Kelly Russell told Reuters Health in an email.
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 15:30:07 -0400
By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - At most colleges, campus police refer students involved in alcohol-related incidents to school officials for discipline rather than taking legal action, according to a study of 343 U.S. schools. After such an incident, students are generally not referred to the campus health center for alcohol screening or intervention, researchers led by Debra H. Bernat from University of Maryland in College Park found. For the study, they asked directors of campus police or security to complete a survey regarding their usual practices following serious, underage and less-serious alcohol incidents on and off campus. For serious off-campus incidents, approximately 40 percent of colleges reported consistently referring students to an alcohol education program and offering counseling or treatment, compared to 16 percent for on-campus incidents, the authors report in Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 15:25:00 -0400

Adeshina, special adviser on public health to the Lagos state government, speaks with Reuters in her office after a news conference on suspected outbreak of Ebola virus in LagosBy Felix Onuah and Tom Miles ABUJA/GENEVA (Reuters) - A Liberian man who died in Nigeria's commercial capital Lagos on Friday tested positive for the deadly Ebola virus, Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu said. Patrick Sawyer, a consultant for the Liberian finance ministry in his 40s, collapsed on Sunday after flying into Lagos, a city of 21 million people, and was taken from the airport and put in isolation in a local hospital. Nigeria confirmed earlier on Friday that he had died in quarantine. "His blood sample was taken to the advance laboratory at the Lagos university teaching hospital, which confirmed the diagnosis of the Ebola virus disease in the patient," Chukwu told a press conference on Friday.


Fri, 25 Jul 2014 15:07:13 -0400

Apple logo is pictured inside the newly opened Omotesando Apple store at a shopping district in TokyoBy Svea Herbst-Bayliss BOSTON (Reuters) - Hedge fund manager David Einhorn, whose picks are closely watched on Wall Street, said he is betting against supermarket chain Safeway Inc but still likes his biggest holdings, including Apple Inc. Einhorn's Greenlight Capital told investors in a letter seen by Reuters that gains in Micron Technology, Apple and SunEdison Inc helped push its funds up 7.9 percent during the second quarter, leaving it with gains of 6.4 percent for the first half. It also described short positions against Safeway, Questcor Pharmaceuticals Inc, cigarette maker Lorillard Inc and Martin Marietta Materials Inc, all of which have been involved in what Einhorn calls "takeover season." Questcor "was the only significant loser in the portfolio," the letter said.


Fri, 25 Jul 2014 14:55:49 -0400

What to Do When Your Food Glows in the DarkWhat should a culture do with glow-in-the-dark food: (a) toss in a multivitamin for good measure; (b) call it part of a complete breakfast; (c) market it aggressively to children; (d) pretend it's a health food by making it low-fat, low-fructose, low-carb, trans fat free, or something like that; (d) all of the above?If the answer shouldn't be...


Fri, 25 Jul 2014 14:55:35 -0400
CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — A West Virginia board Friday suspended the license of the operator of a pain management clinic where investigators found syringes were being reused. It was the second disciplinary action involving the doctor's license within a decade.
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 14:42:21 -0400
A foster parent for a 10-month-old Kansas girl who died after being left in a car in sweltering heat for more than two hours has been arrested on suspicion of aggravated child endangerment, police said on Friday. The man and the older child went into the home without realizing the baby was still in the car, said Lieutenant Dan East of the Wichita Police Department.
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 14:42:02 -0400

IUD InsideLast month's Hobby Lobby ruling by the Supreme Court filled me with such blinding rage that I have been unable to write about it (or even think about it) in a reasonable manner. And railing at the universe with vitriol and bitterness is useless. It turns into preaching to the choir. If any of us hope to effect change, that is one lousy way to...


Fri, 25 Jul 2014 14:17:44 -0400
By Shereen Lehman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Parents of overweight and obese kids may want to help their kids be healthier, but they’re more often willing to make changes in children’s diets than in their activity levels, according to a new study. Researchers found that addressing parents’ beliefs about themselves and their kids, and encouraging doctors to talk about the importance of physical activity could remove important obstacles to obese childrens’ weight loss. “We thought about doing this study because when we worked with families to try to engage them in weight loss, we noticed differences in parent’s readiness to change dietary behaviors versus physical activity behaviors,” said Dr. Kyung Rhee, who was at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, when she led the study. “They weren’t always ready to do both – some families were ready to do one versus the other, but when you’re really trying to engage in weight loss, it’s important to engage in both,” said Rhee, a pediatrician at the University of California, San Diego.
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 14:08:10 -0400

This picture taken on July 24, 2014 shows people walking past an "AIDS 2014" sign promoting the 20th International AIDS Conference in MelbourneSouth Africa's port city of Durban will host the 21st International AIDS Conference in 2016, marking the forum's return to Africa after 16 years, organisers said on Friday. Gathering scientists, policymakers and grassroots workers, the biennial conference is the biggest single get-together on the global HIV/AIDS pandemic. The 20th conference in Melbourne drew around 20,000 people, of whom 13,600 were delegates and the rest were members of the public who attended an outreach event called the Global Village, the International AIDS Society (IAS) said as the six-day event wound down. The July 17-22 2016 conference will return to a venue that saw "a watershed" in the history of AIDS, said Chris Beyrer, a professor at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Maryland, who will co-chair the event.


Fri, 25 Jul 2014 12:33:07 -0400
(Reuters) - Allergan Inc, known best for its Botox wrinkle treatment, said on Friday that European Union regulators had recommended use of its eye drug Ozurdex be extended to treat patients with diabetic macular edema. The European Medicines Agency's recommendation for approval of the extension of the drug's use comes one month after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration granted this broader use. The extension involves allowing Allergan's sustained-release biodegradable steroid implant to be used to treat diabetic macular edema in adult patients who have an artificial lens implant or are unresponsive or unsuitable for non-corticosteroid therapy. The drug is approved to treat macular edema and non-infectious ocular inflammation.
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 12:15:33 -0400

Report Raises Safety Questions on Popular Blood ThinnerBy Suneel Kamath, MD A scientific study released Wednesday suggests the makers of the blood thinner Pradaxa may have held back information that may have prevented serious bleeding complications among some of the million or so Americans using it. Meanwhile, the maker of Pradaxa, German...


Fri, 25 Jul 2014 11:58:46 -0400

steaks and other beef productsBy Ros Krasny WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Overall U.S. food inflation will remain near the historic norm in 2014, even as prices for meat and seafood are pushed higher by disease and widespread drought, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Friday. Prices for shelf-stable and processed items made by companies such as General Mills and Kraft Foods Group are relatively flat. "It appears that supermarkets are maintaining minimal price inflation on packaged food products, possibly in an effort to keep prices competitive in light of rising cost pressures for most perishable items," the USDA said.


Fri, 25 Jul 2014 11:52:13 -0400
By Ronnie Cohen NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Teenagers are more likely to discuss topics like sexual health and drug use with their doctors if their parents are out of the room for at least part of their check-up, a new study shows. It’s really important for them to be there to foster conversation with a doctor,” said study author Matthew Aalsma, of Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis.
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 11:22:59 -0400
By Stephanie Nebehay GENEVA (Reuters) - The World Health Organization (WHO) called on Friday for a humanitarian corridor to be set up in Gaza to allow aid workers to evacuate the wounded and bring in life-saving medicines. Yet some sick and injured in Gaza are dying because of a lack of access to ambulances or health facilities, or the inability to leave the enclave for specialized treatment, the agencies said. As casualties mount daily, WHO officials have discussed the humanitarian corridor proposal with both Israeli and Egyptian officials, but there has been no response yet, WHO spokesman Paul Garwood said. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry pressed regional proxies to agree on a Gaza ceasefire on Friday as the death toll soared to over 800.
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 10:29:27 -0400
By Reuters Staff LONDON (Reuters) - Two new leukemia drugs from Johnson & Johnson and Gilead Sciences have been recommended for approval by European regulators, paving the way for formal approval in a couple of months. The European Medicines Agency said on Friday its experts had issued positive opinions for J&J's ibrutinib, developed with Pharmacyclics, and Gilead's idelalisib. Ibrutinib, marketed at Imbruvica, was approved by U.S. ...
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:37:31 -0400

The logo of Germany's largest drugmaker Bayer is pictured in LeverkusenFRANKFURT (Reuters) - German drugmaker Bayer said a Phase III trial of cancer drug Nexavar in patients with advanced breast cancer did not meet its primary endpoint of delaying the progression of the disease. The study, called Resilience, evaluated Nexavar in combination with chemotherapeutic agent capecitabine, in women with HER2-negative breast cancer. Oral drug Nexavar, which Bayer is developing jointly with Amgen, is approved for use against certain types of liver, kidney and thyroid cancer. Study details are expected to be presented at an upcoming scientific conference. ...


Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:17:19 -0400
By Umaru Fofana FREETOWN (Reuters) - Sierra Leone officials appealed for help on Friday to trace the first known resident in the capital with Ebola whose family forcibly removed her from a Freetown hospital after testing positive for the deadly disease. Radio stations in Freetown, a city of around 1 million inhabitants, broadcast the appeal on Friday to locate a woman who tested positive for the disease that has killed 660 people across Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone since an outbreak was first identified in February. "Saudatu Koroma of 25 Old Railway Line, Brima Lane, Wellington," the announcement said. We need the public to help us locate her." Koroma, 32, a resident of the densely populated Wellington neighbourhood, had been admitted to an isolation ward while blood samples were tested for the virus, Health ministry spokesman Sidi Yahya Tunis.
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:13:31 -0400
By Nita Bhalla NEW DELHI (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Almost 570 people in India have died after contracting encephalitis, commonly known as "brain fever", health authorities said on Friday, warning the death toll may rise with more people still at risk. Outbreaks of Acute Encephalitis Syndrome and Japanese Encephalitis are common every year in India, especially during the monsoon season, and claim hundreds of lives. In West Bengal, where at least 111 people have died from both strains, a senior health official said authorities were taking emergency steps to contain the outbreak.
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 09:13:09 -0400

Members of Doctors Without Borders (MSF) put on protective gear at the isolation ward of the Donka Hospital in Guinea's capital Conakry on July 23, 2014The death toll in West Africa's Ebola outbreak has risen to 660, with the number of cases surpassing 1,000, the World Health Organization said Friday. WHO spokesman Paul Garwood said that the extent of what is the deadliest outbreak of Ebola on record was still emerging. Thirteen were in Sierra Leone, 11 in Liberia and four in Guinea, which had previously borne the brunt. Forty-five new cases were recorded over the same period, in West Africa's first-ever Ebola outbreak.


Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:20:34 -0400

What Not To Say To Someone Who Doesn't Drink


Fri, 25 Jul 2014 08:15:40 -0400

Insulin jabs are pictured on a production line in Novo Nordisk's plant in KalundborgBy Ben Hirschler LONDON (Reuters) - A Novo Nordisk drug combining its long-acting insulin degludec with its type 2 diabetes treatment Victoza has been recommended for approval in Europe, in an important boost for the Danish company. The European Medicines Agency said on Friday it had issued a positive opinion for Xultophy, previously known as IDegLira, implying the medicine is likely to be formally approved by the European Commission within three months. Novo said it planned to launch Xultophy in the first European markets in the first half of 2015. Jakob Riis, executive vice president of marketing and medical affairs at Novo Nordisk, said Britain, Germany and Denmark were likely to be among the first launch markets for the product.


Fri, 25 Jul 2014 07:46:45 -0400
Novo Nordisk, the world's largest insulin maker, said on Friday it expected European Commission marketing authorization for its new two-in-one insulin drug within three months after an EU medicines agency recommended the drug. It said subject to the EU Commission approval and the completion of pricing and reimbursement discussions, it expected to have the drug out into the first European markets by the first half of 2015.
Fri, 25 Jul 2014 07:09:03 -0400

This Centers For Disease Control (CDC) image shows the bubonic plague, a bacterial infection which killed tens of millions of people in 14th-century EuropeA Chinese town has been sealed off and 151 people placed in quarantine since last week after a man died of bubonic plague, state media said Tuesday. The 30,000 people living in Yumen in the northwestern province of Gansu are not being allowed to leave, and police at roadblocks on its perimeter are telling motorists to find alternative routes, the television arm of the official news agency Xinhua said.


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