Tue, 02 Sep 2014 14:30:05 -0400

This is an undated handout photos issued by England's Hampshire Police on Monday Sept. 1, 2014, of Brett King and Naghemeh King, the parents of Ashya King, who have legal proceedings against them continuing in Spain after they took the five-year-old brain cancer patient out of hospital without doctors' consent. Critically-ill 5-year-old boy Ashya King driven to Spain by his parents is receiving medical treatment for a brain tumor in a Spanish hospital as his parents await extradition to Britain, police said Sunday Aug. 31 2014. Officers received a phone call late Saturday from a hotel east of Malaga advising that a vehicle fitting the description circulated by police was on its premises. Both parents were arrested and the boy, Ashya King, was taken to a hospital, a Spanish police spokesman said. (AP Photo/Hampshire Police)SOTO DEL REAL, Spain (AP) — Spanish officials have ordered the immediate release of a detained British couple who were wanted by police in the United Kingdom after they took their critically ill child for treatment abroad without doctors' consent.


Wed, 01 Oct 2014 03:07:41 -0400

File of Michael Phelps reacting after placing seventh in the 100m freestyle in the 2014 USA National Championships in Irvine, CaliforniaBy Steve Ginsburg WASHINGTON (Reuters) - American swimmer Michael Phelps, the most decorated Olympian of all time, was arrested for drunken driving early on Tuesday after speeding and then crossing the double-lane lines inside a Baltimore tunnel, police said. The 18-time Olympic gold medalist later apologized for the incident, saying he was "deeply sorry to everyone I have let down." Police said Phelps, 29, was clocked by radar around 1:40 a.m. traveling 84 miles per hour (135 kph) in a 45-mph (72-kph) zone. He was booked and released. ...


Wed, 01 Oct 2014 03:06:36 -0400

FILE - This undated file image made available by the CDC shows the Ebola Virus. U.S. health officials have warned for months that someone infected with Ebola could unknowingly carry the virus to this country, and on Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014, came word that it had happened: A traveler in a Dallas hospital became the first patient diagnosed in the U.S. (AP Photo/CDC, File)WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials have warned for months that someone infected with Ebola could unknowingly carry the virus to this country, and there is word now that it has happened: A traveler in a Dallas hospital became the first patient diagnosed in the U.S.


Wed, 01 Oct 2014 02:41:32 -0400

A general view of the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in DallasBy Julie Steenhuysen and Sharon Begley (Reuters) - A man who flew from Liberia to Texas has become the first patient infected with the deadly Ebola virus to be diagnosed in the United States, health officials said on Tuesday, a sign the outbreak ravaging West Africa may spread globally. The patient sought treatment six days after arriving in Texas on Sept. 20, Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), told reporters. He was admitted two days later to an isolation room at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. U.S. ...


Wed, 01 Oct 2014 02:39:49 -0400

A general view of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) headquarters in AtlantaBy Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - Efforts to contain the Ebola outbreaks in Nigeria and Senegal appear to have succeeded, even as the virus continues to spread in the hardest-hit West African countries of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, U.S. and African health officials said on Tuesday. In Nigeria, no new cases of Ebola have occurred since August 31, "suggesting that the Ebola outbreak in Nigeria might have been contained," according to one of three reports released on Tuesday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. ...


Wed, 01 Oct 2014 02:38:52 -0400

UN World Food Programme regional director for Asia Tony Banbury speaks at a news conference in BeijingACCRA (Reuters) - The U.N. mission for Ebola wants to achieve significant progress in combating the deadly disease within 60 days, including ensuring that 70 percent of cases receive treatment, its new head Tony Banbury said on Tuesday. At least 3,091 people have died from Ebola since the West African outbreak was first reported in the remote southeast forest region of Guinea in March. The other two most affected countries are Sierra Leone and Liberia. ...


Wed, 01 Oct 2014 02:32:58 -0400
MEXICO CITY (Reuters) - A 52-year-old man from Ghana who has been hospitalized in Mexico does not shows signs of the deadly Ebola virus, the country's health ministry said in a statement on Tuesday night. The patient displayed fever-like symptoms and has been quarantined in a Ciudad del Carmen hospital in southern Campeche state in line with standard protocol, the statement said. Laboratory tests that could reveal the presence of a range of infectious diseases are being performed and will be sent to Mexico's national epidemiological institute INDRE for further analysis, the ministry added.
Wed, 01 Oct 2014 02:17:16 -0400

A worker inspects the Nicotiana benthamiana plants at Medicago greenhouse in Quebec CityBy Sharon Begley NEW YORK (Reuters) - Two tiny companies are preparing to challenge some of the world's largest drug makers in the battle for dominance in the $3 billion global market for influenza vaccines, armed with little more than tiny tobacco plants. The use of plants to produce life-saving pharmaceuticals captured global attention when it was revealed that the Ebola drug ZMapp is produced in the leaves of tobacco plants. ...


Wed, 01 Oct 2014 01:41:44 -0400

A police car drives past the entrance to the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014. A patient in the hospital is showing signs of the Ebola virus and is being kept in strict isolation with test results pending, hospital officials said Monday. (AP Photo/LM Otero)DALLAS (AP) — The first case of Ebola diagnosed in the U.S. has been confirmed in a man who recently traveled from Liberia to Dallas, sending chills through the area's West African community whose leaders urged caution to prevent spreading the virus.


Wed, 01 Oct 2014 00:17:18 -0400

China's first high-security biosafety laboratory will be ready for use by December, a move hailed as a 'crucial' in the fight against EbolaBeijing (AFP) - China's first high-security biosafety laboratory will be ready for use by December, in a move hailed as a "crucial" moment in the fight against pathogens such as the Ebola virus, officials said.


Tue, 30 Sep 2014 23:47:15 -0400

FILE - This undated file image made available by the CDC shows the Ebola Virus. U.S. health officials have warned for months that someone infected with Ebola could unknowingly carry the virus to this country, and on Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014, came word that it had happened: A traveler in a Dallas hospital became the first patient diagnosed in the U.S. (AP Photo/CDC, File)Health officials on Tuesday announced the first case of Ebola diagnosed in the United States — a man isolated in intensive care at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas.


Tue, 30 Sep 2014 23:43:15 -0400

Director of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Dr. Tom Frieden speaks during a news conference after confirming that a patient at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital has tested positive for Ebola, the first case of the disease to be diagnosed in the United States, announced Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014, in Atlanta. The person, an adult who was not publicly identified, developed symptoms days after returning to Texas from Liberia and showed no symptoms on the plane, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)DALLAS (AP) — The first case of Ebola diagnosed in the U.S. was confirmed Tuesday in a patient who recently traveled from Liberia to Dallas — a sign of the far-reaching impact of the out-of-control epidemic in West Africa.


Tue, 30 Sep 2014 22:46:31 -0400
By David Minsky (Reuters) - Marijuana advocates in Mississippi have filed a petition to put the legalization of recreational pot use on the politically conservative state's 2016 ballot, state officials said Tuesday. The petition, filed Monday, comes amid a broader, nationwide push for marijuana legalization spurred by Washington state and Colorado voting to become the first U.S. states to allow recreational use of the drug in 2012. Some 23 states and the District of Columbia permit medical marijuana use, though the drug remains illegal under federal law. ...
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 22:27:41 -0400

FILE - This undated file image made available by the CDC shows the Ebola Virus. U.S. health officials have warned for months that someone infected with Ebola could unknowingly carry the virus to this country, and on Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014, came word that it had happened: A traveler in a Dallas hospital became the first patient diagnosed in the U.S. (AP Photo/CDC, File)The first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States traveled from Liberia, federal health officials said. The unidentified man, who was visiting relatives in Dallas, is being treated at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital:


Tue, 30 Sep 2014 21:30:17 -0400

An awareness poster is presented during a hearing on "Combating the Ebola Threat" at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington, DC, on August 7, 2014Washington (AFP) - The United States has diagnosed its first case of Ebola in a man who was infected in Liberia and traveled to Texas, US health officials said, pledging to contain the virus that has killed more than 3,000.


Tue, 30 Sep 2014 20:56:59 -0400

Modi waves to supporters after paying homage at the Mahatma Gandhi Statue in front of the Indian Embassy in WashingtonBy Steve Holland and David Brunnstrom WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. President Barack Obama and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi agreed on Tuesday to deepen U.S.-Indian cooperation on maritime security to ensure freedom of navigation in what amounts to a response to China's naval muscle-flexing in Asia. ...


Tue, 30 Sep 2014 20:23:48 -0400
CDC Confirms First Ebola Case Diagnosed in U.S.
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 19:51:15 -0400

A view of the main spa area of The Palms hotel, where Portugal's national soccer team will be based at during the 2014 World Cup, in CampinasBy Patricia Reaney NEW YORK (Reuters) - A growing middle class and consumers' evolving attitudes toward health and travel have fueled a global spa and wellness industry worth an estimated $3.4 trillion in 2013, according to a report released on Tuesday. Nutrition and weight loss, preventative and personalized health, complementary and alternative medicine, and beauty and anti-aging treatments were the biggest growing sectors, the report compiled by the non-profit research center SRI International showed. ...


Tue, 30 Sep 2014 19:44:39 -0400
By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Cardiologists should discuss with patients the risks and benefits of chest imaging using ionizing radiation before the procedure, according to a new statement endorsed by several medical organizations. Ionizing radiation, which can come from cardiac stress tests, CT scans and certain heart procedures, is tied to increased cancer risk. “There is continuing concern on the part of patients in the area of ionizing radiation,” said Dr. Andrew J. Einstein, an associate professor of medicine in radiology at Columbia University in New York. ...
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 19:27:10 -0400

Newly born babies sleep inside a private hospital in Kolkata on October 31, 2011Paris (AFP) - A UN target for slashing infant deaths will be missed, mainly through failures to roll back infectious disease and complications during pregnancy, experts said on Wednesday.


Tue, 30 Sep 2014 19:15:43 -0400
(Reuters) - International agencies and governments are fighting to contain the world's worst Ebola epidemic since the disease was identified in 1976. The virus, which causes fever and bleeding, has killed at least 3,000 people. Here is a timeline of the outbreak: March 22: Guinea confirms a previously unidentified hemorrhagic fever, which killed over 50 people in its southeastern Forest Region, is Ebola. One study traces the suspected original source to a 2-year-old boy in the town of Gueckedou. Cases are also reported in the capital, Conakry. ...
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 19:09:56 -0400

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron leaves Downing Street for the House of Commons, in central LondonBy William James BIRMINGHAM England (Reuters) - British Prime Minster David Cameron will on Wednesday promise increased healthcare spending if voters re-elect him next year -- a political carrot aimed at balancing the stick of welfare cuts set out by his finance minister earlier in the week. The pledge will come in the final address of what has been a turbulent annual party conference for Cameron's Conservatives, after a sex scandal and the embarrassing defection of a lawmaker to the anti-European Union UK Independence Party threatened to overshadow their rallying cry for the 2015 vote. ...


Tue, 30 Sep 2014 19:04:09 -0400
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama on Tuesday discussed "stringent isolation protocols" with the head of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to limit the risk of more Ebola cases after a diagnosis was made in Dallas, the White House said. Obama was briefed on the Dallas case by Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control. Obama and Frieden "discussed the stringent isolation protocols under which the patient is being treated as well as ongoing efforts to trace the patient's contacts to mitigate the risk of additional cases," the White House said. "Dr. ...
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 19:01:26 -0400
Dr. Tom Frieden holds a news conference to confirm patient traveling from Liberia was diagnosed in a hospital in Texas.
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 18:59:17 -0400

In this 2006 photo, airport passengers pass by Norm Thompson retail outlet at Portland International Airport in Portland. The Federal Trade Commission announced this week that two companies have agreed to refund $1.5 million to consumers who purchased "shapewear" that supposedly can reduce cellulite and fat because it's infused with caffeine, vitamin E and other things. In a settlement, Norm Thompson Outfitters of Oregon, and Wacoal America Inc. of New Jersey agree not to make claims that their products cause weight loss or a reduction of body size. (AP Photo/The Oregonian, Dana E. Olsen)PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — If you purchased caffeine-infused underwear because of promises it will make you thinner, federal regulators say you were hoodwinked — but at least you can get your money back.


Tue, 30 Sep 2014 18:53:49 -0400

Supplies, including 100 tons of emergency medical aid, are seen before being loaded on to a 747 aircraft at New York's John F. Kennedy International AirportBy Stella Dawson WASHINGTON (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The Ebola epidemic is spreading so fast that it is turning into a humanitarian crisis leaving children orphaned, families hungry and people dying of treatable conditions, top health experts said on Tuesday in calling for more international aid for West Africa. The United States alone has pledged more than $1 billion in emergency hospital units, vaccine development, medical supplies and training for Liberia, while the World Bank has mobilized $400 million in financing. ...


Tue, 30 Sep 2014 18:41:37 -0400
By Kathryn Doyle NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Children who participated in a physical activity program after school did better on thinking tasks than kids who didn’t take part in the program, according to a new study. Participants in the nine-month program performed better on tasks that tested their abilities to block out distractions, focus and multitask, said Charles H. Hillman, the study’s lead author from the Department of Kinesiology and Community Health at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Those skills, he added, are needed by people throughout their lives. ...
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 18:39:08 -0400

CDC Director, Dr. Thomas Frieden, speaks at the CDC headquarters in AtlantaBy Julie Steenhuysen and Sharon Begley (Reuters) - U.S. health officials said on Tuesday the first patient infected with the deadly Ebola virus had been diagnosed in the country after flying from Liberia to Texas, in a new sign of how the outbreak ravaging West Africa can spread globally. The patient sought treatment six days after arriving in Texas on Sept. 20, Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), told reporters on Tuesday. He was admitted two days later to an isolation room at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas. U.S. ...


Tue, 30 Sep 2014 18:25:30 -0400

Cutting Greenhouse Gas Emissions Could Save 3,500 Lives Per Year: ReportWASHINGTON –- Save the planet, save lives?A study released Tuesday says reducing greenhouse gas emissions from power plants in order to curb global warming also would improve health for Americans. That's because reducing greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide would lead to declines in other pollutants -- saving up to 3,500 American lives per...


Tue, 30 Sep 2014 18:25:10 -0400

School Stab-Spree Suspect Alex Hribal Planned To Kill, Cops SayA western Pennsylvania teenager accused of stabbing 21 people at his high school in April was refused admission to a Pittsburgh psychiatric hospital due to safety concerns, a judge said on Tuesday. Alex Hribal, who was 16 at the time of the stabbings, has been held in juvenile detention since he was arrested on April 9 at Franklin Regional High School in Murrysville, Pennsylvania. He is accused of slashing students and staff with two 8-inch kitchen knives. ...


Tue, 30 Sep 2014 18:25:05 -0400
(Reuters) - The United States is discussing the possible use of experimental drugs or blood plasma from a recovered Ebola patient as a potential treatment for a patient in Texas diagnosed with Ebola, a top health official said on Tuesday. Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said it was the first confirmed case to be diagnosed in the United States. (Reporting by Julie Steenhuysen in Chicago; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 18:23:39 -0400
WASHINGTON (Reuters) - President Barack Obama has been briefed about the case of Ebola diagnosed in Dallas, the White House said on Tuesday. Obama was given the details by Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Frieden told reporters earlier he had no doubt that local and federal health authorities could contain the potential spread of the deadly virus in the United States. (Reporting by Steve Holland; Editing by Peter Cooney)
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 18:22:45 -0400
By Anastasia Moloney BOGOTA (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights will consider its first case of forced sterilization of a person living with HIV in Latin America, a rights group has said. The U.S.-based Center for Reproductive Rights, which brought the case of a Chilean woman before the main human rights body in the Americas, says she was forcibly sterilized because of her HIV-positive status by a doctor, without her consent or knowledge, during the delivery of her baby by Caesarean section in 2002. ...
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 18:21:44 -0400

A business man rides an escalator in the financial district of PudongBy Shereen Lehman NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The personalities of husbands and wives may affect their spouses' success at work, suggests a new study. Husbands and wives who were conscientious and helped create satisfying home lives for their spouses were linked to future job satisfaction, promotion and income, researchers found. “The person that you marry and spend a lot of time with . . . can influence you in a different domain,” Joshua Jackson told Reuters Health in a phone call. Jackson, a researcher at Washington University in St. ...


Tue, 30 Sep 2014 18:11:31 -0400
(Reuters) - The first patient diagnosed with Ebola in the United States initially sought treatment six days after arriving in the country, potentially exposing a "handful" of family members and others to the virus, a top U.S. health official said on Tuesday. Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said he had no doubt that local and federal health authorities could contain the potential spread of the deadly virus in the country. ...
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 17:55:01 -0400
Things started to go wrong in the summer of 2011. We had just built a beautiful house by the beach in our coastal town of Westport, Connecticut. I was at culinary school, taking the train in to the city every day, and continuing to write novels that were selling all over the world.I had been diagnosed with ADHD a few months prior, and the...
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 17:54:30 -0400

This image provided by the Department of Health and Humans Services shows the Open Payments page of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. From research grants to travel junkets, drug and medical device companies paid doctors and leading hospitals billions of dollars last year, the government disclosed Tuesday in a new effort to spotlight potential ethical conflicts in medicine. Industry spent nearly $3.5 billion on such payments in the five-month period from August through December of 2013, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which released data on 4.4 million payments. (AP Photo/HHS)WASHINGTON (AP) — From research grants to travel junkets, drug and medical device companies paid doctors and leading hospitals billions of dollars last year, the government disclosed Tuesday in a new effort to spotlight potential ethical conflicts in medicine.


Tue, 30 Sep 2014 17:41:15 -0400
AUSTIN Texas (Reuters) - The patient at a Dallas hospital who tested positive for Ebola is an adult who developed symptoms days after returning to Texas from West Africa, the Texas Department of Health Services said in a news release on Tuesday. The patient, who has not been identified, is being treated in an isolation unit at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, it said. (Reporting by Jon Herskovitz and Marice Richter; Editing by Sandra Maler)
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 17:27:20 -0400
By Sharon Begley NEW YORK (Reuters) - U.S. doctors and teaching hospitals received $3.5 billion from pharmaceutical companies and medical device makers in the last five months of 2013, according to the most extensive data trove on such payments ever made public. The payments, disclosed by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) on Tuesday, include consulting and speaking fees, travel, meals, entertainment and research grants. The names of the recipients of about 40 percent of the payments reported by companies were withheld because CMS had concerns about data inconsistencies. ...
Tue, 30 Sep 2014 17:23:39 -0400

Some of the ultrastructural morphology displayed by an Ebola virus virion is revealed in this undated handout colorized transmission electron micrographNEW YORK (Reuters) - Several pharmaceutical companies with potential Ebola treatments jumped in extended trade on Tuesday after the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed the first case of the virus diagnosed in the country. U.S.-listed shares of Tekmira Pharmaceuticals jumped 20.6 percent to $25.50, BioCryst Pharmaceuticals surged 14.5 percent to $11.20 while Sarepta Therapeutics climbed 8.2 percent to $22.83. (Reporting by Chuck Mikolajczak; Editing by Chris Reese)


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